Inksmudge

How I rotate pens

March 26, 2018

Like I mentioned in a earlier post, I have limited the number of pens I use to three. My Lamy 2000, Pilot Vanishing Point and my Pilot Metal Falcon. The way I rotate them is that I always use the pen that is all the way to the right in my Nock.co Hightower. And when I write it dry, I refill it, and rotate everything to the right and the pen I wrote dry in the left pocket.

Where to go next?

March 19, 2018

Where am I going with pen, paper and so on in 2018?

Pens: I’m not sure, there are some pens I would like. But they are priced way above my comfort level or never in stock.

Inks: I guess this will be where I start to experiment more in 2018 and moving forward.

Notebook: I’m more or less happy with what I have, and I don’t think there will be that many changes here.

Notebook covers: I’m very curious of what Nock.co will come out with in this area this year. And I guess a large portion of what I’ll buy will be coming out of Atlanta.

How things have changed since I got into fountain pens.

March 12, 2018

I was walking around in the city, while Ingri and I were waiting for the train back home and I walked past one Leuchtturm1917 display case and two Lamy display cases. And I thought: damn things have changed since

1.

Back when I started, the only fountain pen related thing I knew about in Norway that was available was Parker. You could get the cartridges, while pens was something you had to order. And there was Mont Blanc stuff. But that’s stupid money.

In 2018, I could jump on the train, buy a Lamy Safari, Al Star or any of the entry level Lamy pens or a Leuchtturm1917 notebook. Something I had to order from UK or US in the past.

This is weird.

Pairing it down even further.

March 05, 2018

I’m lucking enough to own a lot of great pens. But that means that I can’t use all of them. Or I can at least not use all of them all the time.

I own a few Retro51’s, three Pilot Metropolitan, one Lamy Safari, two TWSBI Eco, one TWSBI 580AL, a Lamy 2000, A Pilot Vanishing Point, a Pilot Metal Falcon and one Noodlers Ahab.

The way it works for me is that the pens I use is the ones I have in my Nock Hightower. It has room for three pens. And I have a system for rotating the pens in it. Too few pens means that you run out of ink, and too many means that they dry up or that you spend more time making sure that they don’t dry up than you spend writing with them.

My problem before I started to move pens out of rotation, first with the Metropolitans and then the Eco’s was that there was three pens I enjoyed way more than the others. I love the Metropolitan, but I enjoyed the other five pens way more. And I also loved the Eco’s but I loved the other three pens more.

The result was that I almost never used them, except for when it felt like “I had to”. Therefore I decided to clean and rotate out everything that I didn’t enjoyed the most. And I’ll probably ink them up when I test out inks.

My current pen carry is as follows:

  • Pilot Metal Falcon: Broad Flex Nib

  • Lamy 2000: Medium Nib

  • Pilot Vanishing Point: Broad Nib.

What I Carry

March 05, 2018

What I carry these days are more or less the same as always, with some minor changes.

I always carry three pens, and I rotate them from a collection of five that I have in active use: Lamy 2000(M), Pilot Vanishing Point(B), Pilot Metal Falcon (Broad Flex), TWSBI Clear Eco(B), TWSBI Black Eco(Sub).

All of them are inked up with the same ink, as always. I currently use the Diamine Sargasso Blue, which I reviewed a while back.

As always, I use my Nock.co Hightower to carry my pens and pocket sized stuff.

Some of this stuff might change when Nock.co releases their A5 and Travelers Notebook Covers.

Limiting the number of pens I have in rotation

February 26, 2018

I think there is a maximum number of pens I can keep in rotation. For me is it around five. Because there is only so many pens you can write with regularly before you have to spend a lot of time making sure they don’t dry up.

When I got my Metal Falcon I decided to empty, clean and stop having my two Pilot Metropolitans as a part of my daily carry. This is kind of weird, because up to this point all of the pens I enjoy using have been a part of my rotation. But the truth is that I enjoy all the other pens in my rotation a lot more. And seven pens is a little bit too much.

Removing one notebook.

February 19, 2018

The notebooks I have been carrying as of late — I don’t remember exactly when I re-added the pocket sized notebook to what I carry — but it has remained the same since then.

I carry one Nock.co pocket sized notebook, one Leuchtturm1917 Bullet Journal, one Leuchtturm1917 Lined A5 and a regular sized Traveler’s Notebook filled with lined refills.

The reason I carry two different lined notebooks is that one of them contains drafts for various long form stuff I am writing, while the other is just journal entries.

I have decided to do something about this. What I’m going to do short term is to use up the last lined refill for my Travelers Notebook, before I move over to just using the Leuchtturm1917 and then I’m going to move back to using the Travelers Notebook.

As always, I might go back, if that makes sense. But at the moment it feels light to slim things down a little bit. And only carry one notebook for each thing, instead of two for long form writing. x

A Vanishing Point with CON-70?

February 12, 2018

I really love my newest pen, the CON-70. And, then, I got this idea after a few days of using the pen. Damn, I want a Vanishing Point with this converter. Like I have said many times, I don’t think the 0.4 or 0.5 you can get into the standard converter is enough.

I usually can get through one or multiple days with that. Except for when I en up writing a lot by hand. Then I run through the converter fast. It’s not about that, it’s rather the fact that I hate to have to worry about it. I never do with my Lamy 2000 or TWSBI pens.

The reason I worry is that I have filled it in the morning, and written it dry before the day was over more than once.

Now.

A Vanishing Point with a larger converter, would mean that the pen would also be larger, and it would be heavier. This would probably make it even less accessible to women. And that sucks. But, I’m not saying “scrap the existing one and make this one”. I’m saying make this in addition.

Review

February 05, 2018

I got one of the Noodler’s flex pens in the spring. It was cheap, and I only ordered to verify that flex nibs was something I could get into. And, of course, it was. The next step was a little bit more difficult. Because I wanted something nicer, and hopefully less smelly. And, while there are options, there are not a lot of them.

There was some from Franklin Christoph, two versions I think; I got the news when I was in the middle of it. And I think Edison are selling the same nibs.

Then you have the whole vintage market. And the last option, except for the one I went with, was the Aurora limited edition one.

And then you have Pilot’s Falcon and Metal Falcon.

I went with the Pilot Metal Falcon. Why? The Aurora was limited in availability and way about my comfort zone. And the FC I want (Model 66 Solid Ice) is never available, when I check. And Edison is way too expensive for me.

The Flacon and Metal Falcon are both very good options for what I wanted. Something a little bit nicer, in the less than $300 price range. And with a gold nib. The regular Falcon usually retails around $150, and the Metal Falcon around $240.

What you get for an extra $90 is a bigger converter, a bigger and heavier pen. The increased weight is because the pens made out of metal instead of resin. Other than they look more or less identical; but I think the Metal is a little bit larger. The reason I think you want the Metal Falcon instead of the regular one is because it can old up to 1ml of ink. While the CON-50 (the old standard converter) olds up to 0.5 and the CON-40 (the new standard converter) holds up to 0.4ml.

I think the CON-70 is fantastic. What I ask for in a converter is enough capacity that I can get through a day of a lot of writing without problems. My Falcon can do that, without any problems, my Vanishing Point on the other hand can’t.

Fantastic pen, and I can without doubt recommend it if you are looking for a good pen with a flexible gold nib.