Inksmudge

10 Gifts For The Fountain Pen Enthusiast

December 06, 2015

<a href="http://blog.gouletpens.com/2015/11/10-gifts-for-fountain-pen-enthusiast.html"><strong>Goulet Pens Blog:</strong></a>

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  The fountain pen enthusiast in your life may prove to be one of the most difficult people to shop for!  They already have quite the fountain pen and ink collection, leaving you unsure what to get them. We took the guesswork out of your shopping by hand selecting gifts sure to please the person in your life who loves all things related to fountain pens! Maybe you’ll even find something for yourself too…

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A great place to start, and a good link to send the ones that have to buy you gifts.

Cal Newport

December 06, 2015

<strong><a href="http://calnewport.com/blog/2015/11/25/the-feynman-notebook-method/">Cal Newport</a>:</strong>

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  “[He] opened a fresh notebook. On the title page he wrote: NOTEBOOK OF THINGS I DON’T KNOW ABOUT. For the first but not last time he reorganized his knowledge. He worked for weeks at disassembling each branch of physics, oiling the parts, and putting them back together, looking all the while for the raw edges and inconsistencies. He tried to find the essential kernels of each subject.”

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I always take notes in a notebook when I study, or are trying to learn something I don’t understand. The first thing I do is to read everything once and make a note of everything I don’t understand. The next step is to write down a explanation of all of them. And then I repeat until I understand it properly.

Field Notes Tip #1

December 06, 2015

I just got myself a new toy from our favourite Cupertino fruit company, a iPhone 6s Plus. This is not about that, but something I have found myself doing countless times since I got it on Monday. I often find myself out on the street or somewhere else where I don’t have a table or a flat surface to write on. My solution since I got my first order of Field Notes have been to use the back side of my phone. The 4s and 5s was usable, but far from the best.

The 6s Plus is a different animal. It works perfectly as a writing surface.

If you often find yourself using your lap or something when you need to scribble something down in your Field Notes, try your phone, it’s much better, and the larger phones is much better ; I would even go as far as perfect.

Journal Day!

December 06, 2015

<a href="http://www.thecramped.com/its-journal-day/">The Cramped</a>

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  Today, December 9th, is a day I designated last year as Journal Day. There are many ways to celebrate, or traditions one could keep, to mark the day. Heres some ideas.

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Wednesday is journal day!

TWSBI Diamond 580AL Blue Fountain Pen Review

December 06, 2015

<a href="http://www.penaddict.com/blog/2015/12/4/twsbi-diamond-580al-blue-fountain-pen-review">Brad Dowdy</a>

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  The standard 580 has been a staple of mine for years, but when plastic parts are replaced with aluminum (and in some cases colored aluminum!) and the price goes up only slightly, it’s a no-brainer to replace one with the other.

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I’m going for either this one or the regular version of the 580AL

Your first fountain pen

December 02, 2015

There are so many different things you need to find out, when you move into fountain pens, and there are so many different pens to pick from. But I think there are two pens you should get to start out with. Both of them are cheap: The Lamy Safari and The Pilot Metropolitan.

I think the two of them are good for very different reasons. The Pilot is a overall very well built and fantastic pen, and The Lamy Safari have a much better nib. The reason I think you should get both is to find out what you prefer. The big problem with the Safari is the grip section, it isn’t that good for left handed writers.

But I think the Lamy Safari is a very good pen to use to figure out what kind of nibs you like.

Go for a medium nib, unless you already have a strong preference. The journey starts with your first fountain pen. I like a smooth and very wet nib that leans a wide line, while others like a more scratchy and narrow line, that enables them to write tiny. It all depends on your preference.

Most of you do probably already have a preference when it comes to width, are you buying the 0.7, 0.5 or are you one of the crazy 0.3 people?

There is only one way to find it out, and it will probably change over time.

Let’s get back to my point. I think it is good to get both pens to experience two very different pens, from the two biggest names in fountain pens. I still use both of them, and it was with my Lamy Safari that I tried many different nibs to figure out what I preferred.

Links
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  <a href="http://www.jetpens.com/Lamy-Safari-Fountain-Pen-Medium-Nib-Charcoal-Black-Body/pd/7011">Lamy Safari</a>

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  <a href="http://www.jetpens.com/Pilot-Metropolitan-Fountain-Pen-Medium-Nib-Black-Plain-Body/pd/10177">Pilot Metropolitan</a>

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The Brooks Review

December 01, 2015

<strong><a href="https://brooksreview.net/2015/11/handwritten-notes/">Ben Brooks</a></strong>

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  When I started work at MartianCraft I decided that I would try to shake up some of the ways I worked. It felt like the right time. And since I knew there was going to be a great deal of things I would be learning, my note taking system seemed like the ideal candidate.<br /> I threw out my entire structure for digital notes, grabbed a few Field Notes and started scribbling notes in them. After a month or so, I had decided the experiment was enough of a success to warrant moving to a better notebook. I looked around and decided on the Leuchtturm1917 journal as it looked nice, had solid reviews, and mostly it was on Prime.<br /> (…)<br /> Except, the research doesn’t back this up at all, which is a large reason I decided to make a go at hand written notes. What many studies have found is that students taking handwritten notes instead of typed notes, perform better in recalling the subject matter and in being tested/graded on the subject matter than do their counterparts who took notes on a laptop.<br /> (…)<br /> As I thought back over the frustration of searching analog notes, I realized that I only really searched through them a handful of times. Talk about exaggerating memories. I also realized most of those searches could have been predicted. Because of this I have started to use the infinity symbol on the top of a page of notes which contains things I think I might want to later search for. This will hopefully be a flag upon which I can home in on when I am searching a book of notes. The trick will be using it sparingly.<br /> (…)<br /> What is really bothering me about all of this, is I can’t wrap this up with a neat bow and tell you whether or not analog notes are better. It bothers me not because it makes for a crappy ending to an article, but because I really want to know for myself.

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My system, since I started using pen and paper for notes almost four years ago, have been to use pen and paper when I do it to remember it, and to use digital when I know that it is something I am going to search for later.

How to figure out what you need

November 22, 2015

The first step into pen & paper geekiness can be daunting. And it isn’t easy to find out what kind of stuff you are going to use.

Some people like fine pens, while other people like broad pens, and the first step should therefore be to find out what kind of writing experience you prefer. A pen with a fin tip use less ink, and you can fit more writing into a smaller space, while a broader nib have a smother writing experience. You can always start by getting a 0.7 and 0.5 Pilot G2 to find out what you prefer.

A good place to start is to get various “disposable” pens like the Pilot G2, Hi-tec-C or Uni-ball Signo. Buy various pens, with different tips, and find out what you like. It is much easier to go deeper when you have a basic understanding of what you like.

The next step is notebooks. And there are so many different shapes and sizes. But the thing almost everyone likes, is Field Notes. Start by getting a mixed three pack. And go from there.

Some people only need pocket sized notebooks, while others, like me, need larger notebooks for writing, notes and so on. There are many factors that are important when it comes to notebooks

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  Size. There are many different sizes out there, everything from very small, like for example Field Notes to the huge notebooks some of us really like. Some pick one, and stick with it, while others like me use different sizes for different tasks.

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  Book binding versus spiral bound. They are either spiral bound or more like a book, when you start looking at larger notebooks. There are good and bad things about both. Spiral bound is more comfortable to write in, but less durable, and doesn’t look as good.

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  Short dry time versus less feathering and bleed through. This is a very hot topic. My experience is that paper either have very short dry time or they have more desirable qualities when it comes to fountain pen use. This means that you either get something where the ink dries very fast, or you get something where the ink doesn’t bleed through the pages and so on. I always prefer short dry time.

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The only way to find out what works for you, is to experiment. But don’t buy a bunch of stuff just to buy it. I think it is important to only have stuff that you use, stuff that works for you.

Nanami Paper Seven Seas Writer Review

November 22, 2015

<strong><a href="http://www.penaddict.com/blog/2015/10/27/nanami-paper-seven-seas-writer-review">Jeff Abbott, over at The Pen Addict</a>:</strong>

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  Tomoe River paper took the world (well, a very small portion of the world) by storm a couple years ago for its phenomenal paper. Basically, the paper that Tomoe River produces is super thin, but handles fountain pen nibs and inks like nothing else. You’re hard pressed to find something that will bleed through or feather on its worst day. Brad wrote a bit about it back in 2013, and I’ve never had a bad thing to say about it. I love Tomoe River paper.<br /> […]<br /> Dry time is incredibly fast, but you will smudge or mark up other pages if you close the book just after writing. Nanami was nice enough to include a perfectly-sized piece of blotter paper that you can use to keep that from happening, but I’m reckless and live a life a danger. The paper is thin, so there’s plenty of show-through on the backs of pages, but actual bleed-through is extremely rare, regardless of the pen/ink.

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This notebook looks very interesting. I’m always on the look after the perfect notebook. I think Field Notes is the perfect(or perfect enough) notebook to have in your back pocket. But I haven’t found the perfect fit for all the other sizes. They are unfortunately out of stock, but I will get one to test it out as soon as I can.

Pen Goulet

November 22, 2015

<strong><a href="http://blog.gouletpens.com/2012/06/fp101-filling-mechanisms.html">Pen Goulet</a></strong>

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  There are several filling mechanisms used in fountain pens today. Here I show you how to fill each of 4 types, as well as the pros/cons of each one

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This is a great starting point if you are confused by the different fountain pen filling mechanism. I think it was here I started back in the day.