Review: Pilot Iroshizuku Take-sumi

This was my first Pilot Iroshizuku ink. I got it back in late 2015. And I then thought I reviewed it not long after I got it. Then I thought I did so the last time I discovered that I hadn’t, but no. So: third is the charm?

It was my third bottle of ink. My two first ones was Lamy Black(I think I used it for a week before I got rid of it) and Noodler’s Bernanke Black. The Bernanke was a ink I chose because of its short dry time. And it is amazing. But the Take-sumi is not far behind, and has a few other things going for it.

I think something like the Bernanke is good as your first ink, if you are worried about dry time, and then go for something with longer dry time later. The Take-sumi’s colour is backer than the other black inks I have tried, but it isn’t the blackest black you can find. But it looks good with thinner and broader nibs.

This was also the ink that got me into thinking about finding the perfect compromises between colour, dry time and writing experience. And this is one out of two black inks I can recommend to anyone without any hesitation.

What I use paper for in 2017.

I think using analog tools like analog cameras, pens and paper are enjoyable by themselves. And I use them as my primary tool in any situation where it isn’t a hassle.

My calendar is on paper(I use the Field Notes 56-week planner), I keep a journal(a Midori Travelers Notebook), my to do system is in a Leuchtturm1917 Bullet Journal(I also have parts of it in a Taskpaper file on my Mac) and everything I write, including this, started out in a Lined Leuchtturm1917 notebook. And I also keep a Field Notes in my back pocket; it contains my shopping list and the hours I work; it is the perfect format for the stuff I need on the go.

My guiding principle is that I need to be able to use the analog counterpart without loosing anything I care about, without it being a hassle. But the reason at the end of the day is that I think paper works better for me.

I write drafts on paper because its forcing me to do multiple drafts, I use a planner instead of an app because I can’t stand calendar apps and I prefer managing tasks on paper because I find it easier to maintain focus.

Leuchtturm1917: Bullet Journal

I got the Leuchtturm1917 Bullet Journal in the mail a while back, and I honestly believe this is the best notebook available to run a to do list system, or Getting Things Done system on paper.

My personal system is similar to, but not closely related to bullet journaling. I use a small sub section of [Patrick Rhone’s Dash Plus system], and I use things like underlining and boxes to put emphasis on sub projects or important tasks.

The reason I think it is the perfect tool is a combination of the page layout and the multiple page markers(!)(the Bullet Journal version has three, versus the two you find in the regular version). A dotted page layout is not something I have used a lot, because I’m mainly a writer, and lines are awesome when you write. But you get a lot of the same from a dotted line, while you at the same time get more or less the same flexibility you would get from a blank layout. And the multiple page markers, in contrast to just one is a game changer for me. Because you can for example use one to mark where the point where blank pages starts, where all the tasks behind this point is done and what you are working on.

I have written about the paper in Leuchtturm1917 notebooks before, and I still love it. It is for me the perfect compromise between absorption and dry time. Moleskine and Rhodia is on the other side of two different sides of the wrong compromise.

I love it, and it will probably be my task list / work notebook until I see something “better” or more shiny. And I recommend everyone that are doing some kind of task management system on pen and paper to at least check it out.