The Pencilcase Blog | Fountain pen, Pencil, Ink and Paper reviews: CONID PENS: THE BULKFILLER MECHANISM

The Pencilcase Blog:

Conid is a small-scale Belgian pen brand. For those of you that never heard of them before: they make fountain pens with a unique filling system: ‘the Bulkfiller’. The Bulkfiller system is quite an engineering feat, and there’s a lot to say about it. That’s why I decided to make this into a separate post. I’ll focus solely on the filling system in this post. You can find the review of the Conid Minimalistica fountain pen here.

This posts is going to end up costing me a lot of money. Conid have something very interesting. The filling system is interesting. But the thing that got me interested, and pushed me to add it to my wish list is their pens. They have five different pens, they look kind of different, but the key difference between them are ink capacity. I love how they market themselves: exchangeable nibs & maximum ink capacity.

This is not a cheap pen, but they claim and it looks durable. My two favourite pens from a design perspective is the Lamy 2000 and Visconti Homo Sapiens. But I also love the contemporary look of TWSBI. Conid is the first example I have seen of a pen that can compete with both.

Handwriting will not die… | The Cramped

Patrick Rhone:

Our children. Mine and yours. All of us who write by hand and advocate its importance and advantages. We who have children will write by hand in front of those children. Through such actions they will learn from us that writing by hand is something one does. We will teach them to do the same.

A fantastic piece by Mr. Rhone. I’m getting fed up with the “handwriting is going away” posts. Fine, most people write less with pens than they did 100 years ago. But when I look at the various places I have worked over the years, I can’t remember anyone that didn’t use paper. All of them used it for something. Writing down stuff they have to do on post-it’s during a meeting or writing a todo list on a A4 page.

Why do people use a pen when they have a computer? It is the pragmatic choice. It is just easier to write something down on paper than it is to find a piece of software to do the same thing. Children will also learn how to write by hand for the foreseeable future. The writing essay part of writing can be done on a computer, and the teacher are probably thankful for students that hand in papers written on a computer. But what about math? It is very hard to do what is very simple on paper with a computer without a lot of training.

There are of course areas where we used to use pen and paper where a computer, or a typewriter is better in every single shape or form. But there are also many areas and use cases where paper is better.

Task Management with pen and paper.

I just added a new page to the site. One of the things I wanted to do when I started this site was to put some time into explaining how I use pen and paper to manage my day to day life. You can find the first version of it here. I decided to have it as a page instead of a blog post because I’m going to update it from time to time.

It is a rough first draft. it will be updated from time to time, both in terms of content as my system and tools change, and in terms of some much needed editing.

I’m also going to set up a Public Github Repo to have easy access to the different versions of the text.

Forrest Brazeal: How I got a CS degree with pen and paper (and why I’m doing it again)

forrestbrazeal:

I could write faster than I could type, but without knowing shorthand, this method still wasn’t fast enough to allow me to perfectly transcribe every lecture slide. So I was forced to write smarter, not faster. I’d listen carefully to the lecture while paraphrasing anything that seemed important, in real time, using as few words as possible.

I have tested this out a few times, where I have used my laptop to take notes in entire subjects, and the result is always the same: I remember way more of what I was told in a lecture or seminar when I take notes by hand, and the same goes when I take notes while reading.

I manage everything I do at work with pen and paper; a combination of Midori Travelers Notebook, Field Notes and the notebooks we have at work. There is no reason to do everything digital just because I work as a web developer.

The Pen Addict: Clairefontaine Basics Life Unplugged Clothbound Notebook Review

Jeff Abbott:

The Clairefontaine Basics Life Unplugged notebook is my new favorite notebook. The simple design and wonderful paper, along with the great price of just $9, make this notebook an irresistible tool in my arsenal. If you don’t mind being locked in to a lined-only paper, you owe it to yourself to give Clairefontaine a shot. Who knows — it might be your new favorite paper.

That looks like a fantastic notebook. Some people dislike lined paper, and I feel the same way from time to time. But lined paper is great for making lists and writing because you waste much less paper when you have lines; or even a grid system if you prefer something a little bit more flexible.

Cursive Logic

The Cursive Logic course looks like the obvious place to start for anyone that want to learn(or re-learn) how to write in cursive. My cursive is horrible, but I prefer to write non-cursive anyways, and I always have. But I might order this course just to get better at reading cursive.

For me, the thought of loosing cursive, as in loosing the tradition of know how to read and write it feels like loosing touch with our origin. It feels like loosing the ability to read and write classic greek and latin. In other words it feels like loosing Plato and Aristotle and the History of the great Roman Empire.

Gourmet Pens: Review: The-Paper-Cuts A5 Tomoe River Notebook

Azizah Asgarali:

YES. YES YES. I wish this notebook was easier to buy online, but it’s perfect for me. Although Nanami Paper offers the Seven Seas notebook, it may not be the most practical purchase for overseas buyers, so perhaps this is an alternative.

I won’t buy it for a number of reasons. Get it to JetPens or GouletPens and I’ll consider it. The ordering process is a little bit too much of a hassle for me.

This looks like a excellent notebook that will take more or less any pen or writing instrument – if long dry time isn’t a issue for you. It isn’t too bad with a finer nib, but it is a hassle with a very wet nib.

My Hobonichi Planner has the same paper, and the only time I have seen any bleed through was when I was trying to see how much it would take. The answer is: stupid amounts. And that is very impressive when you see how thin the paper is.

The Well-Appointed Desk: Notebook Review: Word. Dot Grid and Declan Floral Edition

Ana:

Anyway, you be the judge. Does it look the same to you? I tested the same pens at the same time in the same colors. Maybe my eyes are just playing tricks on me. Either way, I think the results on the Word.notebook paper is considerably better than other pocket notebooks and I did test several fountain pens with better-than-expected results. The built-in bullet journal system is a bonus for a lot of people who have embraced the system. Even if you don’t bullet journal, if you use a pocket notebook for lists, then the Word.notebooks definitely provide a leg up over many of its competitors. And I partuclarly like the Declan floral design for being something unique, not overly feminine, but a nice aesthetic alternative to other cover designs.

Word notebooks have been on my radar for a while now. They are a very interesting alternative to Field Notes, especially if you want better paper quality. I think some of their designs look good, close to Field Notes good, while others just look like crap.

Review: The Retro 51.

The first “fancy” pen I ordered from JetPens, after I started to listen to The Pen Addict Podcast, then on the 70Decibels network, was The Retro 51. I fell in love with that pen straight away. It was beautiful, I loved how well it was built, and most of all how the writing experience was.

I had my first one for a year, and I wrote a lot with it, before I lost it when someone stole my jacket. And I ordered a new one. The non-fountain pen market is kind of strange. You have tons of fantastic pens, but most of them look as impressive as a regular bic. You can go up to the Retro 51, it costs around $20, and you get a fantastic pen. Where can you go form there? Well, you have the Lamy 2000 Rollerball, and that is more or less it.

The Retro 51 comes in many different styles and colours, there should be something for everyone. It comes with a Schmidt rollerball refill. There is no doubt that it is a fantastic refill, and I think it is the best non-fountain pen refill that exists. But, you need to do some research, and look for some other options if you prefer a thin line.

This is the only bad thing about the Retro 51, they have taken the Apple approach. You either take what they have decided on, or you have to figure it out for yourself.

I try to always have a non-fountain pen with me for various reasons(bad paper or when someone needs to borrow a pen), and this is that pen.

Lamy 2000 Rollerball Review — Pen Addict

Jeff Abbott :

Back in 2014, I wrote about the iconic Lamy 2000 fountain pen, and talked about my love for the design and the writing experience of the pen. Well, here we are in 2016 and I’ve expanded my Lamy collection to include a Lamy 2000 rollerball. A lot about the rollerball is the same as the fountain pen version, but this one is obviously a bit more simple since it only has a rollerball cartridge inside. Even though there are a lot of differences between this and the fountain pen, it’s a great pen that would be perfect for a lot of people looking for an elegant, classy, and reliable pen for daily use.

I think this pen is the perfect gift, for when you want to give someone a very nice pen. The other option is to go with a Retro 51. Non fountain pens are weird in this aspect, you can either go for a terrible and fancy pen like a Montblanc, or a good pen, that looks good but isn’t expensive enough: Retro 51. The Lamy 2000 is the only option I know about that looks good, is good to write with and is expensive enough to be appropriate as something like a graduation gift.